White-capped clownfish

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The White-capped clownfish is named for the white color mark on its forehead. The name “leucokranos” is derived from the Greek word meaning “white capped” or “white helmet”. It was discovered in 1972 in Mandang, New Guinea. As is the case in our Solomon Islands exhibit, the White capped clownfish is often associated with the Carpet anemone, Stichodactyla sp., and rarely strays far from the protection of its stinging tentacles. A thick mucous coating on its skin keeps the clownfish from being stung.

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Percula clownfish

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The Percula clownfish , also known as the Orange clownfish, is a popular aquarium species, frequently bred in aquaculture facilities. It is naturally found throughout the Indo-Pacific and is generally associated with a host sea anemone such as Heteractis spp. The Percula clownfish is often confused with another similar species, the Ocellated clownfish, Amphiprion ocellaris. The Percula clown has thicker black bands separating the orange and white coloration on its body. It surged in popularity following the Disney/Pixar movie “Finding Nemo”, where it was featured as the lead characters, “Nemo” and “Marlin”.

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Wideband anemonefish

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The Wideband anemonefish differs from its other clownfish relatives in the fact that it has a large white band in the center of its body. Like the McCullochi clownfish, the Latezonatus clownfish has only recently become available to aquarium hobbyists due to unprecedented success by marine aquaculturists. The natural range of the Wideband anemonefish extends from Southern Queensland to Northern New South Wales and Lord Howe Island.

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McCullochi clownfish

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Once rarely displayed in public aquariums, the McCullochi clownfish has recently become available to aquarium hobbyists around the world. Like other species of clownfish, the McCullochi clownfish lays a patch of bright orange eggs at regular intervals, usually in close proximity to its host anemone. Both parents care for the developing embryos and can be seen carefully tending the eggs and fiercely protecting them from potential predators.

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Orange skunk clownfish

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The Orange skunk clownfish is found from the Eastern Indian Ocean and Western Australia to the Philippines and Melanesia. It is a close relative of the Pink skunk clown, A. perideraion, but differs in its orange coloration and single stripe along its dorsal area. Pink skunk clownfish, like their relatives are very territorial, rarely straying from the protection of their host sea anemone. They breed readily in aquariums and will spawn about every ten days. The average nest size is 300 eggs.

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Black ocellaris clownfish

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The Black ocellaris clownfish, or Black Percula clownfish as they are often called, are a color variant of the more popular Orange ocellaris, which is frequently confused with a true percula clownfish A. percula. They are generally small in size and can be found in small groups usually associated with a host sea anemone. The Black ocellaris clownfish is a hardy aquarium species and when kept in pairs can breed readily. Juveniles of this color variety can be light brown in color until they mature.

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Pink skunk clownfish

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The Pink skunk clownfish is named for its pink coloration and the narrow white head band and white dorsal stripe. It is a coral reef dweller often associated with the Magnificent sea anemone, Heteractis magnifica. It is found in the tropical Western Pacific from the Philippines to Japan and Micronesia to Australia and Samoa. It is a hardy species that breeds readily in an aquarium environment.

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Tomato clownfish

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The Tomato clownfish is named for its bright red coloration, which can vary in shade from burnt orange to tomato red. They are one of the larger clownfish species, and can be one of the most aggressive. Females are generally larger than the males, and clownfish have the ability to change sex from male to female. In the Fiji exhibit, Tomato clowns frequently lay eggs, usually on the underside of a rock, and just underneath the safety of a large anemone.

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