Hourglass tree frog

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While “hourglass” is fairly descriptive of the pattern on the back, as with human fingerprints and zebra stripes, each frog has its own unique set of markings, unless, as is sometimes the case, it has no pattern at all. This species occupies a range of habitats from Mexico down into northern South America. Like its much larger relative, the Waxy monkey tree frog, it can lay its eggs above water, into which the tadpoles fall after they hatch. However, if there is little or no shade, it may lay its eggs in the water like most frogs. It is the only frog that can do both.

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Red-eyed tree frog

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For years this amphibian was known either as a spectacular subject of photos, or as a lump-like creature, fast asleep while stuck to a leaf or the wall or glass of its exhibit. Experiments with lighting at the DWA have resulted in increased activity, so that the startling red eyes and beautifully patterned legs and flanks are more likely to be appreciated. Found from Mexico to Northern Colombia, this is another frog that lays its eggs on leaves above water, into which the tadpoles fall.

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Waxy monkey tree frog

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This inhabitant, of the dry Chaco forests in Southeastern South America, has developed some decidedly unfrog-like behaviors. Instead of laying its eggs in water, it builds a nest above it, laying eggs on a leaf, which it folds around them. There the tadpoles hatch, then fall into the stream below. It smears its body with wax secreted out of its own skin, using complicated maneuvers of its hind legs. Its unusually expressive appearance has made it popular in zoos, and it is now captive-bred in increasing numbers.

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